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Friday, November 22, 2013

Guest Post with Author Christie Kelley and Giveaway

Meet author Christie Kelley.

Award winning author, Christie Kelley was born and raised in upstate New York. After seventeen years working for financial institutions in software development, she started writing her first book. She currently writes regency historicals for Kensington. Christie now lives in Maryland with her two sons.

Places to find Christie:
| Site | Facebook | Twitter

Thank you so much for having me here today. I recently guest blogged on another site and the hostess of the blog said something that made me pause. She said that novels tend to romanticize poverty. I found that statement very interesting because I had never really thought about it before now. In my newest Bewitching series, my heroines are certain not rich but I don’t think any of them would consider themselves in poverty. They are healers on the estates and help by tending the sick and being midwives. They don’t have much but they feel they need much either.

In Bewitching the Duke, the hero is a very wealthy duke while in the Enticing the Earl, the hero is in a financial difficulty. But out of seven published books, I have written two books were the hero was having money problems. None were in abject poverty and only one ends up marrying a rich heroine.

So what is the appeal of a heroine or hero in financial straits? There is the “saving” aspect of the story. It gives someone with more money the opportunity to save the other. I’m not sure that is the reason authors tend to use poverty as a plot device.

It does give the hero and heroine a common goal if they both need to work hard for their money. And it can put the hero and heroine in conflict if the poorer one doesn’t want any help from the character with money.

In Enticing the Earl, Simon has been in love with Mia for years. He knows she has no way of helping his financial situation but he can’t help but propose to her with the opportunity arises. Mia doesn’t realize his difficulty but when she discovers it, she offers to release him from their engagement. Not because she has a desire to be wealthy, but because she doesn’t wish to be a burden to him. She understands he should marry an heiress to save his family. This brings conflict to the relationship but also shows a compassionate side to Mia.

Personally, I don’t think many books romanticize poverty. I do believe it is used as a plot device. I’d love to hear what you think. Do you feel poverty is used too often in novels?



Only His Passion. . .

With his estate near bankruptcy, Simon Blakesworth, Earl of Hartsfield already has a perilous secret to keep. Still, when he finds Mia Featherstone badly beaten, he doesn't hesitate to shelter her in his home. . .and offer marriage to protect the lovely healer from her attacker. But Mia is concealing a danger this honorable earl never imagined--and can't resist. . .

Can Save Her Love. . .

Mia's valuable discovery on Simon's land saved her patients' lives. Now the only way she can help the man she's always loved save his home is to secretly find the rest of a cache of hidden artifacts. But their passion is making it impossible for Mia to ever walk away--even from a love that may not survive the truth. . .

Purchase: | Amazon | Barnes & Noble |

Check out the Wise Women series:
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Check out what's up for grabs.

Up For Grabs:
  • 1 eBook copy of Enticing the Earl

To Enter: 
  • Please answer Christie's question: Do you feel poverty is used too often in novels?
  • Please fill out the Rafflecopter form.

Good Luck! 

Special thanks to Christie Kelley for sponsoring this giveaway.
a Rafflecopter giveaway

19 comments :

  1. I don't think that poverty is used too much in romance novels, I just think that it's not always portrayed accurately. There is a vast difference between the poverty seen in a Charles Dickens novel and that shown in romance. Of course, we like HEA, so a case can be made that the reader doesn't want authenticity.

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  2. No and I can certainly relate to it ;)

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  3. No, I don't think poverty is used too often in romances. There have always been the haves and have nots...no matter what era we're talking about. It also makes the courtship between the hero and heroine not so easy...which adds a little conflict and sometimes humor to the equation. Which is all to the good in an historical romance, I think. Thanks for the introduction to Christie on this post. I'm always looking for historical romance authors to feed my reading habit. :-) jdh2690@gmail.com

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  4. I don't think so. No matter what era or time, it goes both ways. :)

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  5. Not really. It's highly relatable. I think all of us have been through times when it was hard to get by.

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  6. No, I don't think that poverty is over usedd. As long as financal difficulty is a part of the story, I do not think it is overly used. Sorry for anytypos, I'm in the hospital and have wires coming out of my hands...(Gall bladdercame out yesterday and I needed aother operation to get the other stones out...)

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  7. No, I don't think that poverty is over usedd. As long as financal difficulty is a part of the story, I do not think it is overly used. Sorry for anytypos, I'm in the hospital and have wires coming out of my hands...(Gall bladdercame out yesterday and I needed aother operation to get the other stones out...)

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  8. It's a good question - but I wonder how much people now even understand what poverty was like then - with the near absence of a social safety net.

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  9. No, I don't think that poverty is used too often in novels.

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  10. I don't think that poverty is used too much in romance books either.

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  11. I don't think it is used too often in books. It is a valuable plot device. Plus in reality, more people live having to worrying about having enough money than those who never have a financial care.

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  12. I don't think so, times were really hard back then so it's common for there to be poverty

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  13. I don't think poverty is used too much in romance novels. There have always been the ones that have money and those of us that wish we did.

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  14. No, I don't think it's used to much. It was and is a fact of life, and does create conflict, which is good for stories. :D

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  15. No, I don't feel that it is used too frequently, especially when you consider the problem that it has been through history.

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  16. No, I don't think it is. If it fits the story, I'm fine with it. In fact it can be quite an eye opener.

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  17. Wow..
    Great giveaway / contest.
    I hope I can have similar giveaway like this too.
    Hope everyone enjoy it. Good luck.

    Regards,
    Ardamus

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